2024 Primary Election Day live blog: 68,000 voters cast in-person ballots

Editor’s Note: This is The Nevada Independent’s 2024 Primary Election Day live blog. We’ll be updating this story throughout the day with dispatches from various polling sites, details on turnout and any election administration matters that emerge. You can find full election results on our Primary Results page, and follow the team on Twitter for the latest news and updates. 

Final vote tally: 68,000 Election Day votes

Nearly 68,000 Nevadans cast votes in person on Election Day, bringing voter turnout in the primary to around 16 percent. The final in-person count means that more than three times as many people voted early — either in person or by mail — than on Election Day.

On Tuesday, more than half of the in-person voters cast ballots after 2 p.m., with Republicans more than doubling the number of Democratic voters.

— Eric Neugeboren, 10 p.m.

Polls close

Polls have closed in Nevada’s primary election, but voters who are still in line are able to vote. Election results are expected to start being released shortly after the final voter in line casts a ballot.

As of 7:10 p.m., more than 42,000 Clark County residents had voted in person on Election Day.

— Eric Neugeboren, 7:10 p.m.

33,000 Election Day in-person votes cast as of 2 p.m.

As of 2 p.m. Tuesday, nearly 33,500 Nevadans had cast ballots in person on Election Day, with Republicans making up the vast majority of in-person votes.

Only around 2,700 nonpartisans had voted on Tuesday as of 2 p.m. Nonpartisans make up the largest share of registered voters but cannot vote in many of Tuesday’s primaries because most races are only for Democratic or Republican voters.

In Clark County, more than 20,000 residents had voted as of 2 p.m., with Republicans outnumbering Democrats by roughly 6,000 and around 1,800 nonpartisans voting.

The total turnout is significantly less than the number of early votes cast, with more than 250,000 people voting early by mail or in person. Democrats had a slight advantage in early voting turnout.

In the February presidential primary, around 12,000 people had voted in person on Election Day as of 2 p.m.

— Eric Neugeboren, 7:10 p.m.

PHOTOS: Voters cast ballots at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas

A woman arrives to vote during primary Election Day at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas on June 11, 2024. (Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)
A voter makes her selection during primary Election Day at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas on June 11, 2024. (Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)
Election workers check in voters during primary Election Day at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas on June 11, 2024. (Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)
Election workers check in voters during prmary Election Day at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas on June 11, 2024. (Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)
A voter returns their voting card during primary Election Day at Desert Breeze Community Center in Las Vegas on June 11, 2024. (Jeff Scheid/The Nevada Independent)

Jeff Scheid, 2:55 p.m.

How to participate in the 2024 Nevada primary election

— Rocio Hernandez, 10:40 a.m.

Polls now open, but many ballots already cast

Primary Election Day voting centers opened at 7 a.m. across the state, allowing those who did not participate during early voting to cast their ballots.

As of Monday morning, about 238,400 Nevadans had cast a ballot in the primary via mail or in-person voting, bringing the total voter turnout to 11.9 percent. 

So far, more than 72 percent of all voters who have cast a ballot have done so by mail, including nearly 80 percent of Democrats and about 61 percent of Republicans. 

Though turnout has been low so far, 44.5 percent of voters who cast a ballot were Democrats, and 41.3 percent were Republicans. Other party registrations accounted for 14.3 percent of the total turnout.

To speed up the process of reporting results, the secretary of state issued new guidance allowing counties to start tabulating ballots as early as 8 a.m. today. During previous elections, counties could only begin counting ballots after the polls closed.

Though tabulation begins this morning, unofficial results will not begin posting until all polls are closed and the last voter in line anywhere in the state has cast their ballot.

To vote on Election Day, voters must be in line by 7 tonight. Mail-in ballots must be postmarked by June 11.

Tabitha Mueller, 7 a.m.

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